greendesigngirl:

Play by Wendy Walgate
The quirky and colourful creations of Toronto ceramic artist Wendy Walgate were one of the new discoveries that caught my eye at this year’s Interior Design Show.
The aptly named Play consists of white earthenware [slipcast and glazed], sitting on top of a vintage toy drum. Walgate explains that her finished collections are built within objects that “reference lost, abandoned and imagined ‘play’ sessions and memories.” 
So what’s green about her creations? Walgate, who has been working with clay for over 25 years, incorporates “heavily used objects, comprised of discarded and abandoned toys from the 1950’s, such as rusty strollers, carriages, wagons” and more. Her site has some fantastic examples of her work in a variety of colour palettes, ranging from the monochromatic to the circus like.
If you’re in Toronto in July, you can check out more of Wendy Walgate’s playful sculptures in person at the Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition.
The 2009 edition of the massive and prolific Interior Design Show was probably the best I’ve ever attended, thanks to an increase in green and Canadian design offerings and the expert publicity and organization of the brilliant team at Faulhaber Public Relations. I’m sure that they’re already busy gearing up for the 2010 show and I’m indeed looking forward to it.
::more Walgate posts::

greendesigngirl:

Play by Wendy Walgate

The quirky and colourful creations of Toronto ceramic artist Wendy Walgate were one of the new discoveries that caught my eye at this year’s Interior Design Show.

The aptly named Play consists of white earthenware [slipcast and glazed], sitting on top of a vintage toy drum. Walgate explains that her finished collections are built within objects that “reference lost, abandoned and imagined ‘play’ sessions and memories.”

So what’s green about her creations? Walgate, who has been working with clay for over 25 years, incorporates “heavily used objects, comprised of discarded and abandoned toys from the 1950’s, such as rusty strollers, carriages, wagons” and more. Her site has some fantastic examples of her work in a variety of colour palettes, ranging from the monochromatic to the circus like.

If you’re in Toronto in July, you can check out more of Wendy Walgate’s playful sculptures in person at the Toronto Outdoor Art Exhibition.

The 2009 edition of the massive and prolific Interior Design Show was probably the best I’ve ever attended, thanks to an increase in green and Canadian design offerings and the expert publicity and organization of the brilliant team at Faulhaber Public Relations. I’m sure that they’re already busy gearing up for the 2010 show and I’m indeed looking forward to it.

::more Walgate posts::

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urbangreens:

Inhabitat » Sharecropper: NYC’s Micro-Farming Public Art Project

PUBLIC ART:
“Urban restoration projects are definitely the new agrarian frontier, as city dwellers rethink the possibilities for crop production in zones formerly deemed barren or simply too gritty. One can no longer be oblivious to the mediocre quality of fruits and vegetables, the costly trucking of fresh produce, or the senseless, landfill-bound packaging involved. It is high time that food production solutions sprout up in one’s own backyard or on windowsills or rooftops that can also patch together a vibrant community. During the summer of 2009, the public art project, Sharecropper, aims to create a united system of agricultural production in the heart of NYC via a fresh interpretation of the landowner tenant agreement. This micro-farming initiative by artist Leah Gauthier might inspire New Yorkers to view wild edibles as agents of change, thanks to the parcel owners who have donated their unorthodox growing spaces for the greening of their real estates.”
via landscapearchitecture

urbangreens:

Inhabitat » Sharecropper: NYC’s Micro-Farming Public Art Project

PUBLIC ART:

“Urban restoration projects are definitely the new agrarian frontier, as city dwellers rethink the possibilities for crop production in zones formerly deemed barren or simply too gritty. One can no longer be oblivious to the mediocre quality of fruits and vegetables, the costly trucking of fresh produce, or the senseless, landfill-bound packaging involved. It is high time that food production solutions sprout up in one’s own backyard or on windowsills or rooftops that can also patch together a vibrant community. During the summer of 2009, the public art project, Sharecropper, aims to create a united system of agricultural production in the heart of NYC via a fresh interpretation of the landowner tenant agreement. This micro-farming initiative by artist Leah Gauthier might inspire New Yorkers to view wild edibles as agents of change, thanks to the parcel owners who have donated their unorthodox growing spaces for the greening of their real estates.”

via landscapearchitecture

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on a name change

So we just switched our URL, business name, etc. over from Ambitious Green to Mintsy. It’s nice finally have a URL that’s six letters, offers more imagery / symbology opportunities, and just sounds “cuter” (yeah, I said it) and more fun.

Whenever I start something new, picking the name is simultaneously the most fun and most challenging aspect of it — and, yeah, finding a free URL is also 90% of that challenge.

Mintsy to us means refreshing, green, cute, fun, playful, and curiosity.  We thought that fit pretty well with what we’re trying to do here.

Here’s how we came across it:

  • created a spreadsheet that took root words, prefixes and suffixes and auto-generated words (I can’t tell you how many times we clicked the refresh button)
  • looked at brands we admired and sought to find something where we could create a standalone, recognizable logo image…for example, Apple without the words “apple”
  • lots of visits to http://nameboy.com/
  • two bottles of wine and six hours

Once we decided upon Mintsy, we searched the Trademark and Patent offices for any instances — and also checked to see if the usernames were available across social networking sites. The only downside is that a username squatter on Twitter has ‘mintsy’ registered, and there’s nothing we can do about it — at least for now.

If you ever find yourself in this situation, make sure to remap your URL correctly so that you preserve your old links.  For example. a link to ambitiousgreen.com/products now redirects to mintsy.com/products.

So there’s our story. I’d love to hear what you think of our new direction!

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hiten:

somewhatfrank:

CrunchPad: The Launch Prototype
I want to test one of these out for sure.

hiten:

somewhatfrank:

CrunchPad: The Launch Prototype

I want to test one of these out for sure.

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Our latest product review: Xeko China cards.  My own kids love this game and yeah, I admit, it’s pretty fun!

Check out the “quick review” and don’t forget to see the product itself here: http://www.ambitiousgreen.com/collections/toys/products/xeko-mission-china-starter-deck

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Join us for our friends & family event

We’re having a 20%-off friends and family event going on at the store!

And if you’re joining us on the blog, we feel like you’re our friend. Or family.  Your pick!

So mosey on over to the shop and just add the FRIENDSFAMILY coupon code for 20% off your total order.

We love you.

Hugs!

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In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted - for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things - some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom. Barack Obama’s Inaugural Address
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How Ambitious Green works

I’ll take a minute and explain how we look at products at Ambitious Green and present them to you.

You’ll notice that when checking out one of our products, you’ll see:

  • A description
  • Why it’s green
  • Why we picked it

…in addition to all the other product details.  

Beyond the product description, “why it’s green” and “why we picked it” are where we talk about the green merits of the product, what makes the product or company significant in a “green” way, and anything else we thought made the product special (its design, its colors, the educational merits, etc.).

For example, this Dancing Alligator toy page not only talks about Plan Toys and their manufacturing processes, but what makes this toy particularly special in how it’s safe for your toddler and the awards it has won.

Next up, I’ll talk about how we compile and publish information about the biggest environmental concerns that affect your buying decisions. Comments and feedback are appreciated!

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For our latest product review session we invited a couple of friends for a tea party.

Green Toys are made in the USA, meeting voluntarily stringent safety standards, and from recycled materials.

GreenToysSavesEnergy

The Tea Set and Dining Set that we feature in this video review are made primarily from recycled milk jugs.  The plastic milk jugs that your family puts in the weekly recycling bin are processed into HDPE plastic, safe for play and food contact, and formed into these engaging toys.

We love this stuff and are excited to offer it at Ambitious Green.

http://www.ambitiousgreen.com/collections/toys

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